ISS Europe 2013 - Abstracts and Biographies

ISS Europe 2013 - Abstracts and Biographies
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Semiconductor challenges for a “Securely Connected Smart World”
Hans Rijns, Chief Technology Officer, NXP Semiconductors
 
Abstract
In electronics today devices and systems are evolving from standalone to connected devices, to cooperative systems. Even some examples of the next stage, autonomous systems, can be observed. Taking today’s cars as an example, we moved from the car as a stand-alone “device”, via connected cars that combine GPS with a mobile data connection to a central system, to cars who electronically communicate with each other via wireless communication. Some cars are able to park fully automatically or can even drive autonomously. A similar evolution is seen in for instance computer gaming: Coming from stand-alone game computers, via connected game consoles and ‘cloud gaming’ we are moving towards web-based games that operate autonomously on the player’s behalf. 

Altogether, the world is becoming fully interconnected and interdependent, with great advances in access to information, everywhere and anytime. This raises the requirements of electronic systems and devices with respect to connectivity capacity, speed and robustness, but also on safety and security. Another effect of the connectivity boost is the increase in interdependencies between the different disciplines and players in the applicable ecosystem, making effective partnering and collaboration a key success factor.

In his keynote speech, Hans Rijns will illustrate how the world is becoming interconnected with Smart Mobility and Smart Energy as application examples. The increasingly complex systems can only be realized by combining technology solutions from collaborative innovation partners.   

Biography
Dr. Hans Rijns is Senior Vice President, Chief Technology Officer, and head of Research at NXP Semiconductors. He is responsible for all applications, systems, circuits and process technology research programs at NXP. The Research technology programs are focused on Transceivers, Sensors & Actuators, Energy & Power management, and Variability Tolerant Design. 

He started his professional career in 1991 at Philips Research as scientist in the area of discrete-time mixed-signal circuits. In 1996 he moved to Philips Semiconductors and held various technical and business management positions successively in the field of optical disc systems and mobile handsets solutions. Since 2006, he continued his career at NXP Research.

Hans holds a M.Sc. and Ph.D in Electrical Engineering from the University of Twente, the Netherlands. He has over 30 scientific publications and holds 6 patents.

Hans is member of Scientific Advisory Board of VIRTUS IC Design Centre of Excellence, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He is member of the Advisory Board of the Electrical Engineering department and the Supervisory board of the Embedded Systems Institute of the Technical University Eindhoven, the Netherlands.

Semiconductors: Key Enablers for a More Efficient Future
Peter Schiefer, President, Infineon
 
Abstract
Energy efficiency is a strong driver for Power Semiconductors and its applications. Continuous improvement of the cost-performance ratio will further increase the market size. Power is a More-Than-Moore example where chip performance, assembly technology and manufacturing processes make the difference. For Europe, this is an opportunity to leverage its strengths. As Power Density is increasing, it also is reaching a lower feature size. This accelerates system integration and thus the SoC approach and SiP solutions. Consequently, system knowledge becomes increasingly important to enhance the market position.

Biography
Peter Schiefer was appointed President Operations in September 2012. 

He holds a degree in electrical engineering and joined Infineon (former Siemens Semiconductor) in 1990. 

He held various leadership positions in the area of Power Semiconductors for industrial and automotive applications, Network and Computer Storage and ASIC & Design Solutions. 

Prior to his appointment as Division President Power Management & Multimarket in January 2012 he was Head of Operations for the Division Industrial & Multimarket starting end of 2008. 

Before that position, Mr. Schiefer served as VP & GM of the Business Unit Discrete Semiconductors.

The Inflection Point: Macro Forces & Emerging Trends That Will Reshape The Semiconductor Industry Through 2016
Barnett Silver, Senior Vice President & Principal, ATREG
 
Abstract
The global semiconductor industry is at a crossroads due to a number of intersecting trends that are impacting all companies, including:
- Reduced growth rates and continued margin pressure
- Continued reductions in public market valuation multiples
- Cost for new fab construction continues to rise
- The center of gravity shifting from the U.S. and Europe to Asia
- Existing foundries are having problems meeting the needs of their clients
- Fabless companies are exploring alternative manufacturing models
 
These pressures are leading to changes in conventional wisdom as many new manufacturing models are emerging and will continue to take shape. In addition, large and medium‐sized companies are reevaluating their strategic positions, core competencies, and business models. These factors will reshape the industry and competitive landscape in a dramatic new fashion during the next three to four years. In this presentation, ATREG highlights the implications for semiconductor businesses over the next three years, and explore the future of semiconductor manufacturing.
 
Attendee takeaways & benefits
After attending this presentation, attendees will know:
- Drawbacks and limitations of existing semiconductor manufacturing models
- New manufacturing models likely to be explored by both IDMs and fabless firms in the coming year
- New industry business models and the rationale for change

Biography
As Senior Vice President and Principal of ATREG, Barney brings over 20 years of experience in finance, real estate, and investment banking to his global technology clients. Barney works with ATREG’s clients across the semiconductor spectrum in Asia, Europe, and North America on acquisition, disposition, and complex strategy assignments. His clients include Freescale Semiconductor, IDT, Micron, Qimonda, Renesas, Texas Instruments and TowerJazz. In addition to leading client assignments, Barney is responsible for the company’s operations, focused on developing new business opportunities and growing the ATREG platform.
Formerly, Barney worked in the Investment Banking and Debt Capital Markets divisions of Morgan Stanley at the company’s New York headquarters. During his tenure, he was involved in raising debt and equity capital for public and private companies as well as advising clients on mergers and acquisitions. Prior to Morgan Stanley, Barney worked in the Investment Banking division of LaSalle Partners.
Barney received his AB degree from Dartmouth College and his MBA for the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He currently serves on the board of Wellspring Family Services, one of the oldest non‐profit agencies in Seattle serving families in need. Prior to this, he serves as Chair of the MIT Enterprise Forum of the Northwest, a non‐profit affiliate of MIT in Cambridge that educates entrepreneurs around the world.
 

Europe’s sustainable innovation engine
Luc Van den hove, President and CEO, imec
 
Abstract
Powerful, and low-cost ICs are the core of next-generation mass consumer electronics, such as game consoles, smart phones, tablets … But they are also essential to provide solutions for the challenges our society is facing, such as the ageing of the population and climate change. For example, semiconductors will be core of a preventive, predictive, personalized and participative healthcare system. To maintain Europe’s leadership in healthcare, in automotive, in energy, in communication systems we need leadership on innovation enabled by state-of-the-art technology platforms in More Moore and More than Moore. We need a balanced approach supporting both innovation in More Moore and More than Moore. Such a balanced approach will make Europe a powerful engine of innovation, fueling the global nano-electronics industry. To realize this, optimal collaboration between all the important players in the semiconductor landscape in Europe and the most advanced infrastructure on 200/300mm and 450mm become indispensable.

Biography
Luc Van den hove is President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of imec since July 1, 2009. Before holding this position he was Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. He joined imec in 1984, starting his research career in the field of silicide and interconnect technologies. In 1988, he became manager of imec’s micro-patterning group (lithography, dry etching); in 1996, Department Director of Unit Process Step R&D; and in 1998, Vice-President of the Silicon Process and Device Technology Division. In January 2007, he was appointed as imec's Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer (COO). 

Under his guidance imec has grown to an organization with a staff of around 2000 people, operating with an annual budget of 320M€ (2012) and with offices in Belgium, the Netherlands, US, Japan, Taiwan, China and India.

Currently, Luc Van den hove is also Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Leuven. He is also a member of the Technology Strategy Committee of ASML.

He has authored or co-authored more than 150 publications and conference contributions. He is a frequently solicited speaker on technology trends and applications for nano-electronics at major top conferences. He has presented more than 30 key note presentations.

Luc Van den hove received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Leuven, Belgium. 
Semi Europe Advocacy
Ourania Georgoutsakou, Director Public Policy, SEMI Europe
 
Abstract
SEMI Europe is committed to industry advocacy:  cooperation with public authorities at all levels is important to reinforce the European semiconductor industry’s global competitiveness. During 2013, SEMI and its members need to actively contribute to revising the European state aid rules, to the EU’s funding priorities for 2020 and the EU strategy for electronics. Decisions made by policy-makers in Brussels affect all of us and it is the role of SEMI to help ensure that these decisions reflect the priorities and needs of the European semiconductor value chain.

Biography
Ourania Georgoutsakou joined SEMI as Director of Public Policy for Europe in October 2012, with the role of liaising between SEMI members and European, national and regional decision-makers to reinforce cooperation between industry and public authorities in the interest of a globally competitive Europe semiconductor value chain. She has 10 years of experience in European policy-making processes and advocacy, gained as Senior Policy Coordinator for the Assembly of European Regions (AER), the largest independent network of regional politicians in Europe. She has worked on such diverse policy areas as the EU institutional set-up and the Lisbon Treaty, and EU health, social, innovation, competition and cohesion policy. Ourania holds postgraduate degrees in EU Law and in EU policy-making and lives with her family in Brussels.  

Turning Innovation into Value for Europe
Jean-Marc Chery, Executive Vice President Chief Manufacturing & Technology Officer, STMicroelectronics
 
Abstract
Europe has a strong potential for research and this is globally recognized. At the same time, it is less capable than other economies in transforming research into products. We as semiconductor industry are aware of both weaknesses and strengths and are strongly committed to support R&D. But only when inventions turn into value research is generating innovation. We must learn from our successes in innovation how to generate value from the very expensive research we are conducting in Europe - in forms which the world envies us - in order to preserve the semi industry and expand and grow a vibrant ecosystem for electronics which could attract talents and resources into our continent and elicit innovation not only in microelectronics but also in the environments microelectronics is pervading more and more. Europe has the know how to develop such ecosystem and we have the task to nurture it.

Biography
Jean-Marc Chery is Executive Vice President, Chief Manufacturing & Technology Officer, and General Manager Digital Sector at STMicroelectronics. He has held the Chief Manufacturing and Technology position since January 2008 and became the General Manager of the Digital Sector in September 2012. Chery leads ST’s Manufacturing & Technology R&D organization and holds overall responsibility for the Company’s Technology R&D including the 12” wafer fab in Crolles, Front-End Manufacturing, Packaging & Test Manufacturing, Product Quality Excellence and Information Technology. He is a member of ST’s Corporate Strategic Committee.

Chery began his career in the Quality organization at Matra, the French engineering group. He joined Thomson Semiconducteurs, a predecessor company to STMicroelectronics, in 1986, and held various management positions in product planning, rising to become General Manager of ST’s wafer fab in Tours, France, in 1993. In 2001, Chery became General Manager of ST’s wafer fabs in Rousset, France. In 2005, he led the company-wide restructuring program for 6-inch wafer manufacturing, before taking charge of ST’s Front-End Manufacturing operations in Asia Pacific.

Chery sits on the boards of ST-Ericsson SA, CATRENE, the European microelectronics R&D program, and AENEAS (Association for European NanoElectronics Activities).

Jean-Marc Chery was born in Orleans, France, in 1960, and graduated with a degree in Engineering from the ENSAM engineering school in Paris, France.


Reinforcing the European electronics industry competitiveness
Khalil Rouhana, Director Components & Systems, Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content & Technology Components & Systems (DG CONNECT), European Commission 

Abstract
In addition to being an important sector (generating €300 Billion per year world-wide and employing more than a million people in the EU), electronic components and embedded systems are a key part of the value chain of a majority of economic sectors from automotive and aerospace, to healthcare, energy, security and web based service industry. They drive innovation and competitiveness across the economy and provide solutions to key societal challenges. A strong industry in this field is a must for Europe, including production capacities, which is one reason why the European Commission has a significant level of investments in the sector. The EU electronics industry is facing major challenges. Despite its strong presence in important vertical markets and in equipment and materials sectors, its share of the world market is decreasing amidst strong competition and focused heavy investments done by the private and public sector in competing regions of the world. This is affecting, on the medium term the competitiveness of the whole industrial fabric in the EU.  As Neelie Kroes announced in May 2012, the European Commission will issue in the coming weeks a strategy on electronics for Europe including a Joint Technology Initiative in the field.

Biography
Nationality : French 
Age: 56
Married with two children Khalil Rouhana is the director for "Components & Systems "in DG CONNECT (Communications Networks, Content & Technology). The mission of the Directorate is to support research and innovation and ensure industrial and business development of smart, integrated and key-enabling ICT technologies, including micro and nano electronics, photonics, robotics, embedded and complex systems and advanced computing. The Directorate is also DG CONNECT lead for Horizon 2020/LEIT, notably coordination of key enabling technologies (KET) in ICT. His previous experience in DG INFSO includes the responsibility of the Directorate of "Digital content & Cognitive systems" where he was responsible for digital content policy in the Digital Agenda and for EU supported research and innovation actions in creative content, information management and language technologies. From 2004 until 2010, he was in charge of the Unit of ICT research and Innovation strategy.  An important part of his career was devoted to monitoring and management of R&D and innovation activities in the public and private sector.  He was also a project officer in the ESPRIT program in the areas of High Performance Computing and Networking and in Future and Emerging technologies. Before joining the Commission in 1992, he was for 5 years the director of an institute and school of engineering (Grande Ecole) in France.  He started his career as research and development engineer for the aeronautics industry, worked for the French University in Beirut and created also his own engineering company. He has two master degrees in electrical engineering.

Panel Discussion: A Single European Semiconductor Strategy

Panelists:
André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé, President and CEO, Soitec

Biography

Dr. André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé co-founded Soitec with Jean-Michel Lamure in 1992. As President and CEO, André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé is responsible for overseeing the strategic, operational and financial activities of the company.

Soitec developed and commercialized the revolutionary Smart Cut™ “atomic scalpel” technology. Since then, the company has continued to innovate and grow. Today it is leading technological advances that will shape the performance of tomorrow’s products on markets like computing, telecommunications, automotive electronics, and lighting. Its Concentrix™ technology has also enabled Soitec to become a global leader in the manufacture of systems used by the concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) solar energy industry.

Prior to founding Soitec, André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé managed several joint development programs between Leti and Thomson-CSF, which focused on the technological transfer from R&D to production applications. These programs included the transfer SOI CMOS for space applications. He was also in charge of several projects, which applied SOI to 3D integration, VLSI and ULSI.

Since April 2010, André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé has been nominated as member of the High Level Group on Key Enabling Technologies. The European Commission established this group composed of industrial and academic experts from the European Member States, tasked with developing a shared longer term strategy for key enabling technologies such as nanoelectronics, nanotechnologies, photonics, advanced materials, and biotechnology. Since 2008, André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé is the treasurer and member of the AENEAS (Association for European NanoElectronics Activities) presidium. He is also a member of the Electrochemical Society, the IEEE and ENIAC (European Nanoelectronics Initiative Advisory Council).

In July 2010, André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé was elected to serve as Chairman of the SEMI EuropeanAdvisory Board. His demonstrated vision, experience and leadership capabilities within the industry contributed to his appointment. He has long played an active role in SEMI activities. In July 2011 he was elected as Vice Chairman of the SEMI International Board of Directors where he was a member since 1995. He is also the recipient of the 1999 European SEMI Award in recognition of his work on Smart Cut™ technology and his overall contributions to the greater semiconductor industry.

André-Jacques Auberton-Hervé served for 3 years as the first Chairman of the SOI Industry Consortium, an international organization launched in October 2007 by 19 founding companies throughout the electronics industry with the mission to accelerate SOI innovation into broad markets. Today, he remains chair emeritus of the SOI Industry Consortium Board of Directors.

Auberton-Hervé holds a doctorate degree in semiconductor physics and a master’s degree in materials science from Ecole Centrale de Lyon (France).

Jean-Marc Chery, Executive Vice President Chief Manufacturing & Technology Officer, STMicroelectronics

Biography
Jean-Marc Chery is Executive Vice President, Chief Manufacturing & Technology Officer, and General Manager Digital Sector at STMicroelectronics. He has held the Chief Manufacturing and Technology position since January 2008 and became the General Manager of the Digital Sector in September 2012. Chery leads ST’s Manufacturing & Technology R&D organization and holds overall responsibility for the Company’s Technology R&D including the 12” wafer fab in Crolles, Front-End Manufacturing, Packaging & Test Manufacturing, Product Quality Excellence and Information Technology. He is a member of ST’s Corporate Strategic Committee.

Chery began his career in the Quality organization at Matra, the French engineering group. He joined Thomson Semiconducteurs, a predecessor company to STMicroelectronics, in 1986, and held various management positions in product planning, rising to become General Manager of ST’s wafer fab in Tours, France, in 1993. In 2001, Chery became General Manager of ST’s wafer fabs in Rousset, France. In 2005, he led the company-wide restructuring program for 6-inch wafer manufacturing, before taking charge of ST’s Front-End Manufacturing operations in Asia Pacific.

Chery sits on the boards of ST-Ericsson SA, CATRENE, the European microelectronics R&D program, and AENEAS (Association for European NanoElectronics Activities).

Jean-Marc Chery was born in Orleans, France, in 1960, and graduated with a degree in Engineering from the ENSAM engineering school in Paris, France.



Rob Hartman, Director Strategic Technology Program, ASML

Biography
After obtaining his degree in Electrical Engineering at Delft University of Technology Rob Hartman got his Ph.D. at Clemson University in South Carolina under the Fullbright Fellowship Program on subject of solar cell reliability. Joined Solenergy Corporation in Boston as Director of Research and Development in 1980, Standard Oil Corporation as Program Manager in 1983 and in 1986 Philips Electronics AMLCD program as head of Product Development. Joined ASML as Marketing Manager in 1998 responsible for technology program and since 2004 as Director Strategic Technology Program.

Laurent Malier, CEO, CEA-LETI

Biography
Laurent Malier is Chief Executive Officer at the Laboratory for Electronics and Information Technology (LETI) research institute based in France, which is owned by CEA and operates within MINATEC pole of excellence.

Dr. Malier graduated from Ecole Polytechnique and received his MS in Solid State Physics from the University of Paris-Orsay in 1990. His thesis covered the synthesis of nanoporous oxides and their applications, and he researched semiconductor nanocristals, fullerenes and optical glasses. In 1996, he was in charge of R&D strategy and programs in electronics at the French Ministry of Defense, where he launched developments in uncooled infrared imagers and high-power gallium nitride RF devices. He also chaired the European Cooperation of DODs in Electronic Components.

In 2001, Dr. Malier joined Alcatel Optronics, a public company producing optoelectronic components for optical telecommunications, in charge of new product development. He took over the semiconductor business unit which became Avanex in 2003, and which he eventually developed into the wafer service business. He joined LETI in 2005 as VP Strategy and Programs. He took over the direction of the institute in October 2006

Luc Van den hove, CEO, imec

Biography
Powerful, and low-cost ICs are the core of next-generation mass consumer electronics, such as game consoles, smart phones, tablets … But they are also essential to provide solutions for the challenges our society is facing, such as the ageing of the population and climate change. For example, semiconductors will be core of a preventive, predictive, personalized and participative healthcare system. To maintain Europe’s leadership in healthcare, in automotive, in energy, in communication systems we need leadership on innovation enabled by state-of-the-art technology platforms in More Moore and More than Moore. We need a balanced approach supporting both innovation in More Moore and More than Moore. Such a balanced approach will make Europe a powerful engine of innovation, fueling the global nano-electronics industry. To realize this, optimal collaboration between all the important players in the semiconductor landscape in Europe and the most advanced infrastructure on 200/300mm and 450mm become indispensable.

Khalil Rouhana, Director Components & Systems, Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content & Technology Components & Systems (DG CONNECT), European Commission 

Biography
Nationality : French
Age: 56
Married with two children Khalil Rouhana is the director for "Components & Systems "in DG CONNECT (Communications Networks, Content & Technology). The mission of the Directorate is to support research and innovation and ensure industrial and business development of smart, integrated and key-enabling ICT technologies, including micro and nano electronics, photonics, robotics, embedded and complex systems and advanced computing. The Directorate is also DG CONNECT lead for Horizon 2020/LEIT, notably coordination of key enabling technologies (KET) in ICT. His previous experience in DG INFSO includes the responsibility of the Directorate of "Digital content & Cognitive systems "where he was responsible for digital content policy in the Digital Agenda and for EU supported research and innovation actions in creative content, information management and language technologies. From 2004 until 2010, he was in charge of the Unit of ICT research and Innovation strategy.  An important part of his career was devoted to monitoring and management of R&D and innovation activities in the public and private sector.  He was also a project officer in the ESPRIT program in the areas of High Performance Computing and Networking and in Future and Emerging technologies. Before joining the Commission in 1992, he was for 5 years the director of an institute and school of engineering (Grande Ecole) in France.  He started his career as research and development engineer for the aeronautics industry, worked for the French University in Beirut and created also his own engineering company. He has two master degrees in electrical engineering.

Riding the Winds of Change … Which Way for Europe?
Malcolm Penn, CEO, Future Horizons
 
Abstract

Future Horizons. Future Horizons will examine the four basic industry drivers – the Economy, IC Unit Demand, Wafer Fab Capacity and IC ASPs – in a top down/bottoms up view of the underlying market trends. Caught in the turmoil of conflicting and contradictory data and a floundering world economy, most firms are adopting a ‘wait and see’ strategy for strategic investments and growth. Yet the underlying IC demand remains firm, with low levels of inventory and negligible overcapacity. The chip market growth rate may have seemingly ground to a halt but new technologies and opportunities are continuing their breakneck pace. Europe’s research competence and creativity remain at the forefront of global activity yet its manufacturing prowess seeming is not keeping pace. With the current winds of change now reaching gale force proportions, will Europe harness its energies to secure its future competitive position?



Biography
Malcolm Penn is the Chairman, CEO, and founder of Future Horizons, Europe's leading semiconductor industry analyst. He is also the President of Future Horizons' Moscow-based subsidiary firm, East-West Electronics, the world’s top market research consultant on the Russian and East European electronics industry.
Established in April 1989, Future Horizons provides business support services for use in opportunity analysis, business planning and new market development in the semiconductor and related industries. Its areas of activity include market research reports, custom consulting, industry forums and seminars, IC and system design evaluation services, and industry training.
Mr. Penn has over 45 years experience in the electronics industry and for most of that time has worked extensively throughout Europe as well as in the United States, the former USSR, Japan and Korea. Future Horizons was also a member of the 1994 European Commission sponsored Cornu Panel of senior industry executives responsible for publishing the “Report of the European Microelectronics Panel” used to help formulate the strategy for EC microelectronics support in Europe.
Prior to establishing Future Horizons, Mr. Penn was Vice President of Dataquest and Director of Dataquest's European Operations, responsible for establishing all Dataquest's European-based research operations. Previously he was Manager of Component Engineering for ITT Europe (now Alcatel) and prior to that held various operations and marketing management positions with the worldwide ITT Semiconductor group.
 

The “New” IC Industry Cycle Model
Bill McClean, CEO, IC Insight
 
Abstract
The IC industry is set to emerge from a difficult 5-year period of minimal growth.  From 2007-2012, the IC market grew at an average annual rate of only 2.1%.  In IC Insights’ opinion, the “bottom” of the current cycle in the worldwide economy and IC industry was reached in 2012 and 2013 will mark the beginning of the next cyclical upturn - one in which the IC industry CAGR will more than triple to 7.4% in the next 5-year period.  

Overall, semiconductor industry cycles are becoming increasingly tied to the health of the worldwide economy. While poor semiconductor industry growth has occurred during periods of strong worldwide economic growth, primarily due to semiconductor industry overcapacity and the resulting IC price declines, it is rare to have strong semiconductor industry growth without at least a “good” worldwide economy to support it. Thus, over the next five years, annual global semiconductor market growth rates are expected to gain significant momentum and closely mirror the performance of the worldwide economy.

Biography
Mr. McClean began his market research career in the integrated circuit industry in 1980 and founded IC Insights in 1997. During his 32 years of tracking the IC industry, Mr. McClean has specialized in market and technology trend forecasting and was responsible for developing the IC industry cycle model. At IC Insights, he serves as managing editor of the company’s market research studies and reports. In addition, he instructs for IC Insights’ seminars and has been a guest speaker at many important annual conferences held worldwide (e.g. SEMI’s ISS and Electronic Materials Conferences, The China Electronics Conference, and The European Microelectronics Summit). Mr. McClean received his Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing and an Associate degree in Aviation from the University of Illinois.
 

Global Economic Outlook – Restoring Growth
Thomas Hueck, Chief Economist, Bosch
 
Abstract
2012 was a difficult year for the economy worldwide. In nearly every region, growth was disappointingly low. The European sovereign debt crisis as well as uncertainties about US fiscal policy have led to a rise in uncertainty among private households as well as companies, pulling down global activity indicators to the end of 2012.

Despite the weak ending of last year, 2013 appears to promise a somewhat more positive development. Compared to one year ago, strains have abated:
- The European debt crisis, though far from being resolved, has normalized, in particular the risk of a break-up of the Euro area has decreased considerably.- Although the outlook for US fiscal policy is still uncertain, the imminent risk of a sharp contraction in fiscal spending has been reduced.
 - The soft patch in many Emerging Markets is ending and growth is resuming. In addition, the change in government in China has been successfully implemented, further reducing uncertainty.
- Raw material prices and the price for crude oil have declined substantially since their cyclical peak at the beginning of 2012.   
Overall the outlook for the global economy has stabilized. Growth will recover moderately, above all in Emerging Markets but also in North America and Europe. However, especially in the Euro-area, growth will remain weak in 2013.

Biography
Name Dr. Thomas Hueck
Date of birth 28. June 1966
Marital status Married, two children
Education
1985 – 1987 Study of Business Science, University of Hanover
1987 – 1990 Study of Economics, Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich 
1990 – 1995 Research Assistant, Seminar for Empirical Economic Research,
Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich
1995 Graduation, Dr. oec. publ., 
Thesis on agglomeration economics
Work Experience
1995 – 1997 Deutsche Bundesbank, Economic Department, Frankfurt/Main
1997 – 2005 HypoVereinsbank, Economic Department, Munich
2005 – 2008 Robert Bosch GmbH, Economic Department, Stuttgart
2008 – 2010 RO China, Business Development (RBCN/BUD), Shanghai
since 07.2010 Robert Bosch GmbH, Chief-Economist, Stuttgart
 

Myth Busting: A Different Take on Infrastructure Rollouts: From Myths and Predictions to Disruptions and Realities 
Hans Streng, Senior Vice President, General Manager Product
Group EV Charging Infrastructure, ABB
 
Abstract
In this embryonic market, the influence of large players often causes dramatic disruptions in the overall development and growth of the market. With global economic uncertainty, the future of EV charging becomes difficult to predict. As a European leader in EV charging, ABB will share insights on navigating through a disruption-driven market and the consequences for the future of charging infrastructure development.

Biography
Mr. Hans Streng serves as SVP, GM ABB Product Group EV Charging Infrastructure. Hans started his professional career in Philips Research in 1985 before taking on general and development management positions. He established a leading broadband data communications company The Industree BV in 1998, which was acquired by BarcoNet NV in 2000. He served as Vice President of Barconet NV (now part of Scientific Atlanta, Inc. / Cisco Inc.) before re-joining Philips in 2002 as Chief Executive Officer of the Digital Networks Division. He served as Vice President and General Manager of the Emerging Businesses unit at NXP Semiconductors, from which he spun-out software-GPS company Geotate Ltd. He served as Chief Executive Officer of Geotate B.V. until acquisition by U-blox AG. He holds a number of non-executive director positions and advisory positions with startup companies. He has degrees in both Automotive and Electrical Engineering (hon’s) as well as Business Administration (hon’s). Most importantly, Hans is married to his love4ever Wendy with whom he has four beautiful, bright and globe-trotting children; and in the end, that is what matters in a bio.
 

Managing the Exploding Demand for Integrating New Materials in IC’s
Ivo J. Raaijmakers, Chief Technology Officer and Director of R&D, ASM
 
Abstract
In order to maintain the semiconductor device scaling roadmap, since the year 2000 we have seen an exploding number of new materials and processes emerge, hitherto unused in the industry. Also the number of candidates for integration into future 10, 7 and 5nm node devices is still growing. This multitude of new processes and materials, and also the interactions between these materials, substantially increases the development risk for each new process generation. This must therefore be managed well. ASM has been centrally involved in bringing hafnium oxide high‐k/metal gates, low‐k for interconnects, and Plasma Enhanced ALD silicon oxide to the market, during which many lessons were learned about what it takes to successfully insert a new material or process into production in the industry. This presentation will discuss the tsunami of new materials coming to us, and how the industry best deals with this in the form of cooperative business models involving academia and R&D centers, material suppliers, equipment suppliers and device manufacturers.

Biography
Ivo J. Raaijmakers currently is Chief Technology Officer and Director of R&D for the Front-End Operations of ASM International NV (“ASM”). Dr. Raaijmakers joined ASM in 1996, starting in its ASM America subsidiary, and is now based in ASM International’s headquarters in the Netherlands. Before joining ASM, he has held positions of increasing responsibility in the area of technology development and management in the field of semiconductors since 1982. Dr. Raaijmakers’ career started at Philips Research Labs, in the Netherlands and later in the US, after which he joined Novellus and later Applied Materials. Dr. Raaijmakers has authored over 50 technical publications, is an inventor on over 90 issued US patents, and holds MS and PhD degrees in Physics from Eindhoven Technical University (the Netherlands). 

Technology and Manufacturing Innovation to Deliver the Next Decade of Computing
Steven Johnston, Director, External Programs and Technology Strategy Technology Manufacturing Engineering, Intel
 
Abstract
As technology complexity and ramp steepness increase each node, the importance of having a hyper-efficient Research-Development-Manufacturing process has become paramount. Not only must a wide net first be cast to vet potential technical options but then making the right down selections of the many possible options based on technical readiness, product benefits, cost and manufacturability is critical. A key part of this process is collaboration between a device maker and the equipment/materials supply chains such that novel technical capabilities can be quickly incorporated into optimized leading edge products in a sustainable manufacturing environment. The pending 450mm wafer conversion will require even closer industry collaboration to realize a timely and cost-effective industry transition while maintaining the cadence of Moore’s Law.

Biography
Steve Johnston is Intel’s Director of External Programs and Technology Strategy where he is responsible for managing worldwide consortia technology and 450mm wafer programs as well as integrating 10nm node and beyond capital equipment strategies.  As part of this, Steve oversees Intel’s upstream capital equipment business development, investment and collaboration processes. He is also responsible for executive alignment with memory and foundry device manufacturers for silicon technology roadmaps.  Additionally, Steve manages Intel’s ITRS engagements and connecting Intel’s long term capital equipment roadmaps to SIA, SEMI and global public policy initiatives.

Steve is a member of the G450C executive management council, the SEMATECH board of directors, IMEC’s executive advisory council, and SIA’s technology strategy committee.  He has a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Florida, currently holds 14 patents and has authored >50 publications/presentations.
 

Collaborative Yield Management as a Key Driver for Competitiveness
Robert Madge, Director of Foundry Services, GLOBALFOUNDRIES
 
Abstract
Yield has become the defining metric for success and failure for Semiconductor Manufacturing at leading edge technologies. The yield challenge has largely been driven by the confluence of the design complexity and the advanced process and packaging technologies/materials. In addition, the factory (Fab) environment and the equipment toolset have also become significant contributors to the yield equation. The solution requires a strong collaborative teamwork approach involving Designer/customer, Equipment provider and the Factory engineering and operations teams to ensure first time yield success, product quality and profitability.

Biography
Robert Madge is director of Foundry Services at GLOBALFOUNDRIES responsible all non-wafer business including Mask, Turnkey, Design and Yield services. He was recently responsible for driving manufacturing robustness and yield improvement methodologies and systems across all GLOBALFOUNDRIES manufacturing locations and has been on assignment in GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ Dresden facility for past 18 months.
Prior to joining GLOBALFOUNDRIES in Dec 2010 he spent 21 years at LSI where he was responsible for LSI’s technology roadmap. He was also integral in the start-up of the LSI Gresham Manufacturing facility and set up the Pan-Asian Test and Product Engineering Operations based in Hong Kong.
A graduate from Sheffield University in England and has written over 20 papers and holds twelve patents in the areas of Test, Yield and Design for Manufacturing.
 

Navigating the European Ecosystem for Innovation in Power Semiconductors, from Research to Production
Johannes M.C. (Hans) Stork, Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, ON Semiconductor

Abstract
The need for and economic benefit of efficient power generation, transmission and utilization has gained significance in the past decade. The demand for electric energy has grown rapidly in the world, partly because of the developing nations and also to reduce dependencies on fossil fuels. Power semiconductor technology has been enabling better efficiencies and has long been a strength in Europe, from components to applications, especially automotive. The electrification of automobiles adds new needs and opportunities to this technically challenging segment of the semiconductor industry. ON Semiconductor, a premier global supplier of high performance silicon solutions for energy efficient electronics has two manufacturing sites in Europe, building both discrete and integrated technologies, such as IGBTs, medium and high-voltage MOSFETs and, BCD technologies with automotive qualifications. The company offers a broad portfolio of products for all semiconductor functions along the power supply chain. This product portfolio is supported by development and innovation in areas such as high frequency switched mode power supplies, potentially with high speed, wide bandgap devices, as well as super junction, high voltage Silicon transistors. These projects are resourced not only internally, but work is done in collaboration with universities and research institutions. Specific areas of leading research efforts, with support of local and European government funding, will be described, showcasing the value of an expert ecosystem of companies, universities, and consortia. Turning innovative ideas from concept into manufacturable products in a worldwide competitive environment can benefit from early co-creation in the value chain to more effectively overcome the challenges of early adoption.

Biography
Dr. Stork is Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at ON Semiconductor. He oversees the development of wafer process technologies, modeling and design kits, IP libraries, as well as packaging technologies and assembly support. 

Prior to joining ON Semiconductor, Dr. Stork was Group Vice President and Chief Technology Officer of the Silicon Systems Group at Applied Materials. From 2001 to 2007 he was Senior Vice President and the Chief Technology Officer of Texas Instruments. Before that, Dr. Stork was Director of the Internet Systems and Storage Lab at HP Laboratories, Hewlett-Packard. Upon joining HP, Dr. Stork held the position of Director of the ULSI Research Lab. Dr. Stork started his professional career at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center, researching advanced bipolar technology and circuits.  

Dr. Stork was awarded two Outstanding Technical Achievement Awards from IBM. He (co-)authored over 100 cited papers and holds eleven US patents. He was elected IEEE Fellow in 1994 for his contributions to SiGe devices and technology. He served on several conference program committees, including IEDM, VLSI Technology Symposium, BCTM, and Symposium on Low Power Electronics.  He was EDS editor of the Circuits and Devices magazine. He chairs an IEEE field award committee and is past-chair of two others.

Dr. Stork served on the Board of Directors of Sematech, and of the Semiconductor Research Corporation. He has been a member of the SIA Technology Strategy Committee since 1999.

Dr. Stork was born in Soest, The Netherlands, and received the Ingenieur degree in electrical engineering from Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, and holds a PhD from Stanford University.   
 

The Paradigm Shift in Lighting - How the Lighting and Electronics Industry
Can Leverage Each Other
Kees van der Klauw, Senior Vice President, R&D Manager
Professional Lighting Solutions & Chief Architect, Philips Lighting
 
Abstract
For more than 120 years the lighting industry has predominantly been focusing on creating more efficient light sources and applications in functional lighting. Lighting control systems penetration has been very low with limited functionality, due to its complexity, cost and high power and voltage requirements.
The recent advancements in solid state lighting (LED) have not only led to another breakthrough in light source efficiency and lifetime in invariable applications, the so-called LEDification of lighting. 
The real revolution, the digitization of lighting is yet to come and will involve a paradigm shift from a lighting component restricted approach to an application centric approach. No longer will (intelligent) light sources limit the application space. The Electronics, IT and Lighting industries can leverage to create new, unprecedented applications in lighting experience, quality and energy saving.

Biography
Kees van der Klauw graduated from the department of Electronics Engineering of the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and received a Ph.D. in the area of semiconductor devices (CCD’s) in 1987. He joined Philips Research where he worked several years on the design and characterization of CMOS devices and processes.  
In 1992 he moved to Philips’ Flat Panel Displays where he held positions in project management, engineering-, operations- and general management of Philips LCD activities and was involved in the establishment of Philips’ LCD joint ventures in Japan and Korea.
In 1999, he joined Philips Consumer Electronics and became the development manager for High-End TV in Bruges, Belgium. In 2003, he became in charge of platform development for Philips Television and in 2005 became CTO of Philips Television, Monitors and Professional Display Business. 
Kees joined the Philips Lighting Sector in 2009, where he is the Chief Architect of Philips Lighting and the R&D Manager for Professional Lighting Solutions. 

Disruptive innovation for product test equipment is a key strategy to win in consumer market
Luciano Bonaria, President & General Manager, SPEA Automatic Test Equipment
 
Abstract
European Semiconductor IC, MEMS and Sensor device manufacturers play a leading role in the Smartphone and Tablet supply chain. In order to conquer and maintain a leadership position in this consumer market, continuous technological and cost reduction innovation is required. Testing technology for these devices is constantly being challenged to achieve these always changing goals.

Biography
Luciano Bonaria is the President and CEO of SPEA SpA where he operates in the functions of the General Manager, Director of Sales and Product Architect.
Bonaria is one of the leading experts in the world Engineering Test for the Electronic industries, Semiconductors and MEMS.

In 1976, at 28, he founded SPEA in Volpiano (To) and carries out the design and development of test equipment (ATE) for the electronics industry and leads the company to be the second world leader.
In 1995 he designed the architecture of test equipment (ATE) for the semiconductor industry and leading the company to be the fourth world leader in this important area.
In 2003 he invented and designed the architecture of complex integrated machines (Test Cell) for testing intended to industries producing MEMS and leads the company to be the uncontested world leader in this field.
Luciano Bonaria was born in Turin in 1948 and in 1968 he graduated in electronics at the Institute Peano of Turin.
In 1968 he started working as a designer of equipment for testing printed circuit boards for Olivetti.
From 1969 to 1976 he worked at General Electric in Calumet, which later became Honeywell, as a design engineer and architect of equipment for testing boards, microchips and memories. 

Innovation and Internationalization:
The Key Success Factors for European SMEs
Franco Preti, CEO, LPE SpA
 
Abstract
Worsening conditions of economy, little or no growth, globalization are imposing new challenges to European Small Medium Enterprises. Innovation and Internationalization more than ever are the key factors for SME success. LPE, a SME equipment maker focused on epitaxy, describe its background and explain its innovation and internationalization efforts.

Biography
Franco Preti is working within the epitaxial technologies organization of LPE S.p.A and has held this position since January 1991. Franco Preti joined Preti Engineering, a family owned predecessor company, in 1981. 
Preti Engineering became LPE SpA in 1984 after merging with another company.
Franco Preti occupied several operational functions in LPE Headquarters in Milan (Italy) area, starting with R&D functions, product and business development.
He helped define the company strategy and mission, supervising product development strategy and developing the international operations of the company. He holds several patent applications related to epitaxial technologies, for process and equipment.
Franco Preti is also the CEO of ETC Epitaxial Technology Center in Catania (Italy) and holds or has held Board positions in other SME.
Franco Preti was born in Italy, in 1957, and graduated with a degree in Electronics from the Polytechnic University of Milan in 1982 and then with a professional practice certificate in engineering from the Polytechnic University of Milan. 
Closing Remarks and Adjourn
Cor Claeys, Director, imec
 
Biography
Cor Claeys received the Ph.D. degree from KU Leuven in Belgium, where he is Professor since 1990. At imec he is Director of Advanced Semiconductor Technologies responsible for strategic relations. His main interests are silicon technology, device physics, low frequency noise phenomena, radiation effects and defect engineering and material characterization. He co-edited a book on “Low Temperature Electronics” and “Germanium-Based Technologies: From Materials to Devices” and wrote monographs on “Radiation Effects in Advanced Semiconductor Materials and Devices” and “Fundamental and Technological Aspects of Extended Defects in Germanium”. He authored and coauthored 14 book chapters and more than 1000 technical papers. Prof. Claeys is a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society and of IEEE. He was the Founder of the IEEE Electron Devices Benelux Chapter, Chair of the IEEE Benelux Section, an elected AdCom Member of the Electron Devices Society and the EDS Vice President for Chapters and Regions. He was EDS President in 2008-2009. Presently he is on the IEEE Board of Directors. He was also the recipient of the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. Within the Electrochemical Society, he was the Chair of the Electronics & Photonics Division from 2001 to 2003. In 2004, he received the Electronics Division Award.