Austin Shearin - Thermistor Arrays for Asset Monitoring

Session 14: FHE Applications II

Thermistor Arrays for Asset Monitoring
Wednesday, June 21, 2017 
1:55 PM - 2:15 PM

Brewer Science’s asset monitoring systems use a derivative sensing technique with an array of flexible printed thermistors to identify the warning signs of an asset failure event and alarm the user to act accordingly. Failure events can be defined as events that shut down tools, damage equipment, or cause loss of chemical product.

Brewer Science’s thermistors have less than 250 ms response time. This allows us to go beyond providing simple temperature measurements. We are able to rapidly characterize the changes in the environment by calculating the derivative of the signal in real time.

Brewer Science has demonstrated this monitoring system to improve the safety of lithium polymer batteries, as they have been known to catch fire during use. Batteries degrade due to a number of causes that can be difficult to predict. As a battery ages, its internal resistance rises, increasing the likelihood of triggering a runaway exothermic reaction. However, even a brand new battery can become dangerous due to improper use or manufacturing defects. By measuring the battery’s surface temperature we can track the health of a battery and predict the occurrence of a thermal runaway event and advise the user before the battery self-destructs.

This talk will discuss the processing methods that allow Brewer Science to create flexible temperature sensors for monitoring multi-dimensional systems, the mechanisms used to characterize the environments, and discuss the many applications of derivative sensing for asset monitoring.

 

Speaker's Biography

Austin Shearin is a Research Associate at Brewer Science. He has worked with Brewer Science since May of 2016. He is currently a member of the Emerging Technology Advancement group where his priority focus is on printed electronics and sensor research and development. Austin completed his Master’s Degree in Materials Science at Missouri State University. His education was primarily focused on semiconductor materials in the fields of nano-bio interactions and solar energy applications. He has presented at multiple conferences including Materials Research Society, American Physical Society, Argonne National Laboratory Research Symposium, and Nanofrontiers. He has co-authored papers published in Journal of Physical Chemistry C and Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

 


SPEAKER
Austin Shearin
Brewer Science